Steering Committee

Noelle A. Baker

Noelle A. Baker

Noelle A. Baker is an independent scholar whose publications focus on transcendentalism and the recovery of the writings and reception of nineteenth-century American women; they have appeared in volumes such as Ralph Waldo Emerson in Context (2014) and Toward a Female Genealogy of Transcendentalism (2014) and in journals such as The Concord Saunterer: A Journal of Thoreau Studies, Documentary Editing, ESQ, NEH Humanities, Poe Studies, and Resources in American Literary Study. She is the editor of Stanton in Her Own Time: A Biographical Chronicle of Her Life, Drawn from Recollections, Interviews, and Memoirs by Family, Friends, and Associates (2016); co-editor of Margaret Fuller: Collected Writing (2023); and co-editor of The Almanacks of Mary Moody Emerson: A Scholarly Digital Edition, an NEH We the People designee and recipient of two NEH Scholarly Editions Grants. Twenty Almanacks have been published in the Northeastern University Women Writers Project’s Women Writers Online. Baker is co-editor in chief of the peer-reviewed journal Scholarly Editing.
Mary Chapman

Mary Chapman

University of British Columbia-Vancouver
Mary Chapman is Professor of English and Academic Director of the Public Humanities Hub at the University of British Columbia-Vancouver. She is the author of the award-winning Making Noise, Making News: Suffrage Print Culture and US Modernism, Features Editor for Legacy, and director of the Winnifred Eaton Archive. She has also edited or co-edited two award-winning recovery projects: Becoming Sui Sin Far: Early Fiction, Journalism and Travel Writing by Edith Maude Eaton, and Treacherous Texts: US Suffrage Literature, 1846-1946.
Amy E. Earhart

Amy E. Earhart

Texas A&M University
Amy E. Earhart is Associate Professor of English and affiliated faculty of Africana Studies at Texas A&M University. Earhart’s work has focused on building infrastructure for the digital humanities, embedding digital humanities projects within the classroom, and tracing the history and futures of DH, with a particular interest in the way that DH and critical race studies intersect. Her digital projects include The Millican Massacre, 1868, DIBB: The Digital Black Bibliographic Project, and “Alex Haley’s Malcolm X: ‘The Malcolm X I knew’ and notecards from The Autobiography of Malcolm X” (a collaborative project with undergraduate and graduate students published in Scholarly Editing). Earhart has published scholarship on a variety of digital humanities topics, including the monograph Traces of Old, Uses of the New: The Emergence of Digital Literary Studies (2015), the co-edited collection The American Literature Scholar in the Digital Age (2010), and a number of articles and book chapters in volumes including the Debates in Digital Humanities series, DHQ, and Textual Cultures.
Melissa J. Lingle Martin

Melissa J. Lingle Martin

North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics
Melissa J. Lingle-Martin is an Instructor at the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics where she teaches courses in American Studies and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. In her teaching, she encourages students to read texts of all mediums in their multidisciplinary context and to use the tools of the digital humanities to see and understand literature, culture, and the world in new and meaningful ways. Her research is multidisciplinary and examines the connections between social justice and the social imaginary, especially as manifested in the literature, law, and visual culture of nineteenth-century America. Her essay “Iconoclasm, Parody, and the Provocations of Lydia Maria Child’s A Romance of the Republic” appears in Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers and she contributed to Visualizing Objects, Places, and Spaces: A Digital Project Handbook while serving on the founding Executive Board of the Digital Humanities Collaborative of North Carolina from 2019 to 2021.
Ashley Reed

Ashley Reed

Virginia Tech
Ashley Reed is Associate Professor of English at Virginia Tech. A scholar of American literature, American religion, and digital humanities, she has published articles in ESQ, J19, Religion Compass, and Digital Humanities Quarterly, in addition to her monograph Heaven’s Interpreters: American Women Writers and Religious Agency in Nineteenth-Century America (2020). Reed held an Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship in Digital Humanities in 2014-15. She served as Project Manager of the William Blake Archive from 2007 to 2013 and has directed collaborative digital projects with undergraduates at UNC and Virginia Tech that include the Prudence Person Scrapbook Project and the Virginia Lucas Poetry Scrapbook.
Janel Simons

Janel Simons

University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Janel Simons is Instruction Specialist at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Libraries. She organizes information literacy instruction for foundational courses across campus, courses in the humanities, and the high school users program. Simons earned a Ph.D. in English in December 2018, specializing in nineteenth-century American literature and culture, with a focus on the antebellum period. Her doctoral research approaches literatures of the U.S. War with Mexico, examining the ways in which this war shaped the nineteenth-century cultural and literary imagination.
Jordan L. Von Cannon

Jordan L. Von Cannon

Florida Gulf Coast University
Jordan L. Von Cannon is Assistant Professor in the Department of Language and Literature at Florida Gulf Coast University where she teaches classes on early and 19th-century American literature, U.S. women writers, gender and sexuality, and the digital humanities. She has published on female development in Jane Austen and the intersection of female identity and primitivism in U.S. naturalist fiction. She is working on a book manuscript that traces the relationship between American industriousness and non-normative narratives of female development. Since 2016, she has served as the Vice President of Publications for SSAWW.
Seretha D. Williams

Seretha D. Williams

Augusta University
Seretha D. Williams earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism from Northwestern University, a master’s degree and doctorate in comparative literature from the University of Georgia, and a master’s degree in library information science from Valdosta State University. An interim department chair, professor of English, and affiliated faculty in the Women’s and Gender Studies Program at Augusta University, Williams specializes in Africana literatures and digital humanities. She is a expert on Margaret Walker, the Harlem and Black Chicago Renaissances, the Black Arts Movement, and Afrofuturism. Williams is a Black Book Interactive Project scholar (University of Kansas), a co-editor of the essay collection Afterimages of Slavery, and co-founder and editor-in-chief of Third Stone, a digital journal for Afrofuturism. She is the digital humanities fellow for Pamplin College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences and the facilitator for the college’s digital humanities course, Human Experience and Meaning. William’s current research project focuses on Margaret Walker’s unpublished manuscript “Goose Island” and 1930’s Chicago.
Jean Lee Cole

Jean Lee Cole

Loyola University Maryland
Jean Lee Cole, Professor of English and Faculty Director of Community-Engaged Learning and Scholarship at Loyola University Maryland, is the author or editor of several volumes and peer-reviewed articles that explore the works of multiethnic American writers, American periodicals, and American visual culture, including Zora Neale Hurston: Collected Plays (2008) and Freedom’s Witness: The Civil War Correspondence of Henry McNeal Turner (2013). She is also an editor of the academic journal American Periodicals and a former president of the Research Society for American Periodicals. Cole worked with the University of Virginia to publish the Winnifred Eaton Digital Archive.
Jina DuVernay

Jina DuVernay

Robert W. Woodruff Library, Atlanta University Center
Jina DuVernay is the Program Director of Engagement and African American Collections at the Atlanta University Center’s Robert W. Woodruff Library. She manages collection development in support of African American Studies. DuVernay actively contributes to a number of initiatives that help advance librarianship and archival work related to African Americans such as the Association for the Study of African American Life and History Information Professionals Group (ASALH), the American Library Association’s (ALA) Coretta Scott King Book Awards Jury, the Association of College and Research Libraries’ African American Funnel Project, and the Black Caucus of the American Library Association. DuVernay is also an editor of the online publication, WOC+lib, as well as the Library Diversity and Residency Studies (LDRS) Journal. She holds an MLA from Auburn University at Montgomery and an MLIS from the University of Alabama.
Brigitte Fielder

Brigitte Fielder

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Elizabeth James

West Virginia University